Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Strange Dream

I've sometimes used this space to record my dreams, usually ones that stood out as being exceptional, powerful, or personally meaningful in some way. So I feel I must record the dream I had last night. It's short, but powerful.

You see my grandmother died last May, and it was completely unexpected. She was 89 years old and seemed perfectly healthy, looked younger, was of sound mind, but then she had a stroke, which completely destroyed her, and she died seven weeks later.

I've had a few dreams of her. But last nights dream stood out the most powerful to me.

In the dream I was going to the public library to print out a copy of my grandmothers obituary. It was strange because this particular library usually has about 30 public computers, which are connected to a printing station, but when I got there there was only about ten, with empty spaces where the computers should have been. There were different security guards too, and I approached one and asked about what had happened to the computers and they said they had some kind of power outage and those computers were damaged as a result and were being repaired.

So anyway, I log into one of the few remaining computers and proceed to print out my grandmothers obituary, two copies. The picture was different than the actual, but I won't elaborate. So then I go outside, and parked outside of the library I see my grandmother sitting in the driver's seat of her car waiting to give me a lift. Yes, the very same person whose obituary I held in my hand was alive and well waiting to give me a ride. I get into the car, and for some strange reason didn't get the connection that this was a peculiar event. It was like I instantly forgot what had happened. Forgot that my grandmother had died. Forgot that I had printed out her obituary. Forget that I was holding the obituary in my hand of the person who was offering me a ride. It was just like complete amnesia.

So I go for the ride with my grandmother, heading towards the last place she lived when she died, but somehow ended up back in my hometown, down a popular drive beside a wooded park. I won't elaborate. At some point we got out of the car to take a walk. My grandmother trips and falls. Her glasses fall off her face. I help her up, she's okay. Just happy to be with her. And then I wake up.

That's it. That's all I remember. Pretty strange. Think about it, someone you know who died. You're printing out a copy of their obituary, and then when you're done that same person who died, who is written about in the obituary you hold in your hand, is waiting for you outside to give you a lift.

Sounds like an episode of the twilight zone, right, but for me it really happened. Well it happened in my dreams, however real that is. Probably about as a real as the life you lived, once you are dead. Yeah. That's when reality crumbles away, if mind survives death, what than is real? It's a huge mystery, the mystery of death, of the possibility of life after death. It's the greatest mystery ever.

Monday, March 13, 2017

Getting Tough


So, as I mentioned in my previous post, I had a little bit of trouble with somebody messing with my bike, breaking off my bicycle computer when it was left outside at work, and since that incident I have been extremely worried that my bicycle would be stolen.

You see, I commute to work everyday, and the bicycle is left outside for hours, and realized that if I want to continue this setup I needed a better lock. I thought I had a good lock, and it's not a bad lock by any means, but I needed the best. So I went ahead and purchased the New York Fahgettaboudit mini U-lock by Kryptonite. It's the best U-lock they sell, and retails for over a hundred bucks.

I'm very happy with it. It gives me tremendous peace of mind. Even though at the same time I am dismayed that, yes, any lock can be defeated if a person has the right tools and enough time, but this one at least will protect against the most common methods, namely bolt cutters and leverage attacks, and so I feel much more comfortable than I did before.



I use the new lock for the rear wheel, Sheldon Brown style, which is you lock the U-lock to the rear wheel and object your locking it to, as opposed locking it to both the frame, the wheel, and the object, simply because it's not big enough for that, which is also one of its strong points. As long as it's positioned between the frame's rear triangle it is impossible to remove the rear wheel from the frame without destroying the wheel in the process.

For additional peace of mind I use a second U-lock, my old one, for the front wheel and frame, locking that too to a fixed object, as well as an additional cable lock for my rear rack.

I'm very happy with the setup. Hopefully, my bicycle will be safe for years to come, and won't encounter any more problems with anyone messing with my bike while I'm at work.

Monday, February 6, 2017

When the Darkness Clears


Been riding my bike everyday for months now. It is now my primary mode of transportation. I used to be a very avid walker, I've written about it here, but now I ride more than I walk.

There are a lot of reasons for it. Mostly because I love to ride. I love the freedom of being outside, the freedom of the open road, being completely self-powered and self-contained, and not contributing any pollution. I hate being in confined spaces. And I absolutely hate riding the city bus. But I also love saving money, and walking is too slow. Therefore, a bicycle is the perfect fit for me.

For the first time in my life I am now a full-time bicycle commuter. I average about 50 miles a week. And that's not for recreation, that's entirely commuting to work and running errands. I ride my bike every single day of the year, rain or shine, daytime and nighttime, in temperatures below freezing and temperature way above 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

I've been a cyclist all my life, but until recently it was mostly just for recreation, as I usually walked or took the bus to work and school, never road the bike more than maybe a few times for those purposes, but now I do it every day, and have no plans of stopping. Been doing it for six months now and so I've been putting a lot more wear and tear on my bike. Finally reached the 3000 mile mark on my odometer, which means 3000 miles on both my chain and tires, and so finally retired them. Got new ones, new chain, new tires, and installed them myself. It was the first time I ever replaced my own chain. Was quite the adventure, thank goodness for YouTube! Because I would have been lost otherwise.

Very happy with my bike. The original tires were Continental Top Touring 2000, only got one flat tire, and that wasn't until 2000 miles. Wonderful tires, but they stopped making that particular model, so this time after careful research went with the Schwalbe Marathon tires, which are supposed to be the best, virtually puncture proof, but got a flat tire the first 20 miles. Can you believe it? Well to be fair, it was a long screw, and the conditions were wet, and think it probably would have caused a flat tire no matter what kind of tire you were using. It was just bad luck, happened on the way to work too, so that sucked. But fortunately was only about a half a mile away, so just walked it, and fixed it after work. Nothing like fixing a flat tire in the dark on a cold rainy night, with a mini pump that I soon learned couldn't reach the high pressure my tires needed. Still it got me home, and I quickly ordered a new pump, a Topeak road morph with built in pressure gauge. Haven't had to use it yet for an actual new tube replacement, but tested it out, and is at least better than the other one. I also never leave home without two spare tubes, not just one, like I used to, because there's nothing worse than being stranded in the dark on a cold and rainy night miles away from home all because you forgot to pack a spare tube. How about fixing a flat tire, but getting another flat, but not having another spare? Not something I want to experience. That's why it pays to be prepared.

Oh yeah, I almost forget. Since I got new tires, which I installed around January 1st, I also replaced my cycling computer/odometer with an inexpensive Cat Eye one. My old one still worked, but the mounting hardware was falling apart, held together by Gorilla Tape, so I figured it would be fun to start out with a clean slate of zero miles for my new tires and chain.

Well guess what, everything was going smoothly until last night some piece of shit stole it off of my bike, by forcibly breaking it off. But see the computer is no good without the sensors, which they left on the bike, the only thing its good for without it is a clock. So it was completely a senseless act of destruction. Either the idiot didn't know that the computer was useless without the sensors, or it was not so much an act of theft, but an act of vandalism. Now I'm worried the piece of shit is targeting my bike, and is going to try to steal it too, so am now going to carry two u-locks, instead of just one.

I do lock my bike very well, use three locks, a cable for my rear rack and frame, a good u-lock for my frame and rear wheel, but only used a cable for my front tire, now I'm worried they may cut that to steal the front wheel, so like I said now I'm going to have to bring a second u-lock. My secondary u-lock isn't as good as my primary one, but it's better than the cable. But will plan on investing in a more expensive second lock within the next few weeks. I'm leaning towards a Kryptonite Mini Evolution to be used strictly as secondary security to lock the front wheel to frame. My bike isn't even that valuable, it's almost 15 years old now, but I've kept it in really good condition, and except for a few scratches, and sloppy touch-ups using blue nail polish that doesn't quite match, it looks almost like new. So people that don't know, such as the piece of shits that steal a cycling computer that they've made unusable by destroying the mount and not taking the sensors, may assume it's more valuable than it actually is.

Anyway, despite the minor setback, all is well. As in all things I've complained about and lamented about over the years, both here and elsewhere, I feel that all the hardships I've endured have only made me stronger. As they say, all life is a school, you learn just as much from the good times as you learn from the bad times, and sometimes it seems like the worst of times are actually the most educational, but no matter how bad things seem to get, if you get through it in one piece, things are bound to get better in time. If nothing else maybe you'll see that you've gained the perspective of what it means to feel tragedy and what it means to feel hope materialized into the reality of prosperity and peace, and you realize that no matter how bad things had been, and still can be, when the darkness clears you'll see that once again all is well.